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blog: Don Marti

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Two visions of GDPR

13 February 2018

As far as I can tell, there are two sets of ambitious predictions about GDPR.

One is the VRM vision. Doc Searls writes, on ProjectVRM:

I am sure Google, Facebook and lesser purveyors of advertising online will find less icky ways to stay in business; but it is becoming clear that next May 25, when the GDPR goes into full effect, will be an extinction-level event for tracking-based advertising (aka adtech) as a business model.

Big impact? Not so fast. There's also a "business as usual" story, and that one, you'll find at Digital Advertising Consent.

Our complex ecosystem of companies must cooperate more closely than ever before to meet the transparency and consent requirements of European data protection law.

According to the adtech firms, well, maybe there will be more Bürokratie, more pointless dialogs that users have to click through, and one more line item, "GDPR compliance", to come out of the publisher's share, of course, but the second vision of GDPR is essentially just adtech/adfraud as usual. Upgrade to the new version of OpenRTB, and move along, nothing to see here.

Personally, I'm not buying either one of these GDPR visions. Because, just for fun and also because reasons, I run my own mail server.

And every little decision I have to make about how to configure the damn thing is based on playing a game with email spammers. Regulation is a part of my complete breakfast, but it's not the whole story.

The government doesn't give you freedom from spam. You have to take it for yourself, one filtering rule at a time. Or, do what most people do, and find a company that does it for you, but it has to be a company that you trust with your information.

A mail sender's decision to comply, or not comply, with some regulation is a bit of information. That feeds into the software that makes the final decision: inbox, spam folder, or reject. When a spam message complies with the regulations of some country, my mail server doesn't say, "Oh, wow, compliant! I can skip all the other checks and send this one straight to the inbox!" It uses the regulation compliance along with other information to make that decision.

So whatever extra consent forms that surveillance marketers are required to send by GDPR? They're not the final decision on What The User Must See. They're just data, coming over the network.

Some of that data will be interpreted to mean that this request is an obvious mismatch with how the user chooses to share their info. The user might not even see those consent forms, or the browser might pop up a notification:

4 requests to do creepy shit, that's obviously against your preferences, already denied. Isn't this the best browser ever?

(No, I don't write copy for browser notifications. But you get the idea.)

Browsers that implement tracking protection might end up with a feature where they detect requests for permission to do things that the user has already said no to—by turning on tracking protection in the first place—and auto-deny them.

Legit email senders had to learn "deliverability," the art and science of making legit mail look legit so that it can get past email spam filters. Legit advertisers will have to learn that users aren't identical and spherical, users choose tools to implement their data sharing preferences, and that regulatory compliance is only part of the job.

Should web browsers adopt Google’s new selective ad blocking tech?

EVERYONE ELSE IS DOING IT

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